Single-Phase vs Three-Phase Power Explained

Single phase power is:

– Used in most homes and small businesses
– Able to supply ample power for most smaller customers, including homes and small, non-industrial businesses
– Adequate for running motors up to about 5 horsepower; a single phase motor draws significantly more current than the equivalent 3-phase motor, making 3-phase power a more efficient choice for industrial applications

 

 

3-phase power is:

– Common in large businesses, as well as industry and manufacturing around the globe
– Increasingly popular in power-hungry, high-density data centers
– Expensive to convert from an existing single phase installation, but 3-phase allows for smaller, less expensive wiring and lower voltages, making it safer and less expensive to run
– Highly efficient for equipment designed to run on 3-phase

 

 

To illustrate the difference between single phase and three phase, imagine a lone paddler in a canoe. He can only move himself forward while his paddle moves through the water. When he lifts the paddle out of the water to prepare for the next stroke, the power supplied to the canoe is zero.

Now picture the same canoe with three paddlers. If their strokes are synchronized so each is separated by 1/3 of a stroke cycle, the canoe receives constant and consistent propulsion across the water. More power is supplied and the canoe moves across the water more smoothly and efficiently.

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7 Solutions for Powering, Protecting and Controlling Your Video Surveillance System

Security Camera, CCTV on location, airport

Video surveillance is big business. A March 2017 report published by MarketsandMarkets, an international market research firm that serves 1,700 Fortune organizations worldwide, values the video surveillance market at $30.4 billion last year and projects that number to reach $75.6 billion by 2022.

Whether you use your video surveillance system to protect your assets, monitor employee behavior, deter tampering and theft, or lower your insurance rates, you want to be sure it’s reliable. Video surveillance systems can be vulnerable to power problems, such as blackouts, brownouts, surges, and line noise, that can disrupt security cameras and corrupt data. Here are seven solutions to help your system remain functioning at its full potential 24/7. [Read more…]

What is a Public Safety DAS System?

The global public safety in-building wireless DAS market is estimated to grow from $404.2 million in 2016 to $1,740.1 million by 2021.

What Is It?
A Distributed Antenna System (DAS) is a network of antennae that communicate with a central hub to distribute signals over an area or building, such as stadiums, hospitals, campuses and airports. A DAS extends coverage across multiple antennae to provide coverage in all areas of a building, where signals could normally be degraded or dropped.  In public safety applications, the central communication hub requires uninterrupted power to ensure emergency responders can communicate over the network. [Read more…]

E-Rate: How School Districts Can Benefit

Did you know funding opportunities are available for school districts seeking to bridge the technology gap and meet the needs of digital learning in the 21st century? Also known as E-Rate, it is one of the nation’s largest programs supporting technology development in education today. [Read more…]

Alarm Fatigue – The White Noise in Healthcare

Spend time in the patient-care areas of any hospital or clinic and you’ll hear it: a near-constant stream of beeps coming from the audible alarms on medical equipment and healthcare devices.

Spend enough time in patient-care areas and you might not hear the beeping at all…not because it stopped, but because your ears became immune and all those alarms faded into white noise.

Estimates show 85-95% of all alarms in a healthcare environment don’t require intervention. But as nurses’ and other caregivers’ ears become desensitized – a phenomenon known as alarm fatigue – patients’ lives could be put at risk. Assuming all alarms are false alarms can create a dangerous delay in response. But responding to every alarm that sounds diverts a caregiver’s attention from true medical emergencies. [Read more…]