Which Type of UPS System Works Best with a Generator?

Do you have a generator to supply power during a lengthy blackout? You’ll get the most out of it if you connect your generator to a UPS system. But there’s more than one kind of UPS – it’s important to choose the right type of system so it will play nicely with your generator power. [Read more…]

Pure Sine Wave vs. Modified Sine Wave

In regard to output waveform, two types of UPS systems exist—the kind that produce a pure sine wave and the kind that produce a stepped approximation of a sine wave, also known as a pulse-width modulated (PWM) sine wave. The main difference between pure sine wave and modified sine wave systems is that a pure sine wave system in battery backup mode is guaranteed to produce a cleaner output for any piece of equipment connected to it, whether it’s a computer at a workstation or a server in a data center. The same cannot be said of a modified system, which produces a step, or PWM, sine wave output. Its output is choppier and provides equipment with a less stable output waveform.
[Read more…]

Where There’s Power, There’s a Power Cord

Even in today’s increasingly wireless world, most IT equipment requires an AC power cord.

When you installed your servers, routers or other devices, you connected the power cables and probably haven’t thought about those cords since. But there are several good reasons to consider replacing or upgrading the power cords on your equipment. [Read more…]

Centralized vs. Decentralized UPS Systems

One of the first steps in choosing the most appropriate UPS solution is deciding whether to use a centralized or decentralized setup. While both have their advantages, knowing how to answer this question depends on a number of factors.

Here are five things to consider when deciding between a centralized and decentralized solution: [Read more…]

What’s the Difference Between 24 AWG, 26 AWG and 28 AWG Network Cables?

When shopping for Cat5e, Cat6 or Cat6a network cables, you may notice an AWG specification printed on the cable jacket, like 24 AWG. The AWG stands for American Wire Gauge, a standardized system for describing the diameter of the individual conductors (wires) that make up a cable. To understand the differences between similar network cables with different AWG sizes, let’s take a look at what wire gauge means. [Read more…]