Pure Sine Wave vs. Modified Sine Wave

In regard to output waveform, two types of UPS systems exist—the kind that produce a pure sine wave and the kind that produce a stepped approximation of a sine wave, also known as a pulse-width modulated (PWM) sine wave. The main difference between pure sine wave and modified sine wave systems is that a pure sine wave system in battery backup mode is guaranteed to produce a cleaner output for any piece of equipment connected to it, whether it’s a computer at a workstation or a server in a data center. The same cannot be said of a modified system, which produces a step, or PWM, sine wave output. Its output is choppier and provides equipment with a less stable output waveform.
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Power Cable Jacket Types Explained

P010-012

SJT Jacket

If you’ve been looking for a new or replacement detachable power cable, you might have seen an alphabet soup of abbreviations for the cable jacket type. Understanding these abbreviations will help you choose the correct power cable for your application.

Each of these letters designates a usage rating derived from the National Electrical Code. Here is the most common nomenclature used for power cable jackets:

  • S – Service Grade (Extra-Hard Service Grade if not followed by J, V or P); normally rated to 600V
  • J – Junior Grade; a “J” cord is rated for hard service up to 250-300V
  • V – Vacuum Cleaner Cord; light-duty cable
  • P – Parallel Cord; light-duty zip cord
  • T – Thermoplastic; most often polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
  • E – Elastomer; a copolymer that adds flexibility, especially in sub-freezing conditions
  • O – Oil-Resistant outer jacket
  • W – Outdoor; stands up to moisture and sunlight

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Use Hospital-Grade Power Cords for Safe Connections in Healthcare Settings

Hosptial-Grade Power Cord

Hosptial-Grade Power Cord

Hospitals, clinics and other medical offices must adhere to safety regulations defined by the National Fire Protection Association’s Life Safety Code to ensure safe, reliable power and help protect patients and staff from shocks and other hazards.

The code includes requirements regarding the use of power cords. To be rated as hospital-grade for use in healthcare environments, power cords undergo rigorous testing to ensure they meet stringent UL standards, specifically UL 817 and CAN/CSA C22.2 no. 21 for use outside of the patient-care vicinity.

At the heart of UL’s standards for hospital-grade power cord sets are requirements for the plug. The blades must be solid, instead of folded brass. The plug must include an internal cable retention device or flexible strain relief to prevent stress to the plug’s internal connections. The plug will be marked “Hospital Grade” and have a visible green dot.

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The Importance of Smart PDUs in Cryptocurrency Mining

Bitcoin and Beyond

bitcoin
Bitcoin is the world’s first cryptocurrency, described by its inventor, Satoshi Nakamoto, as “a new electronic cash system that uses a peer-to-peer network to prevent double-spending…completely decentralized with no server or central authority.” Since Bitcoin’s 2009 debut, more than 900 cryptocurrencies have flourished, including the popular Ethereum and Litecoin.

Cryptocurrencies can survive only due to miners, who confirm every transaction and add it to a blockchain. Miners are then rewarded with Bitcoins or other cryptocurrencies, but it can be difficult to keep up with the expenses involved in a successful mining operation. As you know, one must bring in more Bitcoins than one spends to be profitable!

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The Benefits of Antimicrobial Power Strips for Healthcare Facilities

Tripp Lite Antimicrobial power strip outlet view

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate nearly two million hospital patients in the U.S. annually contract a healthcare-acquired infection (HAI), at a cost over $36 million a year.

Frequently, HAIs are spread through cross-contamination when objects are handled by multiple people. Any object in a healthcare setting touched by staff, patients or visitors becomes a potential breeding ground for harmful microbes such as C. diff and MRSA. The threat of HAIs is especially significant within the patient-care vicinity, where patients receive their treatments.

Hidden Sources of HAIs

Think of frequently handled objects in a hospital and what likely comes to mind are door handles, light switches and elevator buttons. Not so obvious are objects used in the treatment of patients that may need to be moved from one room to another, thus increasing the chances of transferring bacteria and viruses. Medical facilities often use carts holding equipment that needs to be plugged in. The assembly on the cart may include a special-purpose relocatable power strip, also known as a power strip.
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