Connect Your Laptop to the Internet without a Built-in Ethernet Port

Laptop computers are trending toward thinner models that do not include an Ethernet port. If you rely on Wi-Fi day-to-day, you may not notice the change. But in situations where Wi-Fi is weak or unavailable, you can count on a USB 3.0, 3.1 or USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter to get the signal you need.

No ethernet in laptops

The Lighter Laptop

As laptop users run more browser-based applications and store more files in the cloud, they require less local storage space. This, combined with smaller and more efficient processors, means laptops can afford to be thinner and lighter without sacrificing performance.

When laptop manufacturers shrink their products to facilitate more portability, some connectivity features may not “make the cut.” These often include the Ethernet port since it is, quite literally, thicker than the device.

Again, even if you typically use a wireless internet connection, consider some scenarios where an Ethernet connection might be missed:

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Rolling TV Carts for Education

Use Rolling TV Stands to Help Enhance Learning on a Tight Budget

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Do more with less. This is the challenge facing virtually every school, particularly when it comes to in-classroom technology.

Not everyone learns the same way, but strong visuals enhance learning for most students. That’s why TVs and interactive white boards are common tools for today’s teachers. However, keeping classrooms equipped with the latest technology might quickly break the budget.

Cut Costs with Shared Resources

With a rolling TV cart for flat-screen TVs, a school can keep technology expenditures in check by sharing displays and interactive white boards among a number of classrooms. When the lesson plan calls for A/V resources, the teacher simply wheels a height-adjustable TV stand in front of students to make learning more engaging and exciting. And by using the built-in adjustments such as height and tilt that are found on many rolling TV stands, the teacher can ensure all students have a clear view of the screen. This isn’t possible with conventional projectors.

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Pure Sine Wave vs. Modified Sine Wave

In regard to output waveform, two types of UPS systems exist—the kind that produce a pure sine wave and the kind that produce a stepped approximation of a sine wave, also known as a pulse-width modulated (PWM) sine wave. The main difference between pure sine wave and modified sine wave systems is that a pure sine wave system in battery backup mode is guaranteed to produce a cleaner output for any piece of equipment connected to it, whether it’s a computer at a workstation or a server in a data center. The same cannot be said of a modified system, which produces a step, or PWM, sine wave output. Its output is choppier and provides equipment with a less stable output waveform.
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Power Cable Jacket Types Explained

P010-012

SJT Jacket

If you’ve been looking for a new or replacement detachable power cable, you might have seen an alphabet soup of abbreviations for the cable jacket type. Understanding these abbreviations will help you choose the correct power cable for your application.

Each of these letters designates a usage rating derived from the National Electrical Code. Here is the most common nomenclature used for power cable jackets:

  • S – Service Grade (Extra-Hard Service Grade if not followed by J, V or P); normally rated to 600V
  • J – Junior Grade; a “J” cord is rated for hard service up to 250-300V
  • V – Vacuum Cleaner Cord; light-duty cable
  • P – Parallel Cord; light-duty zip cord
  • T – Thermoplastic; most often polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
  • E – Elastomer; a copolymer that adds flexibility, especially in sub-freezing conditions
  • O – Oil-Resistant outer jacket
  • W – Outdoor; stands up to moisture and sunlight

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Use Hospital-Grade Power Cords for Safe Connections in Healthcare Settings

Hosptial-Grade Power Cord

Hosptial-Grade Power Cord

Hospitals, clinics and other medical offices must adhere to safety regulations defined by the National Fire Protection Association’s Life Safety Code to ensure safe, reliable power and help protect patients and staff from shocks and other hazards.

The code includes requirements regarding the use of power cords. To be rated as hospital-grade for use in healthcare environments, power cords undergo rigorous testing to ensure they meet stringent UL standards, specifically UL 817 and CAN/CSA C22.2 no. 21 for use outside of the patient-care vicinity.

At the heart of UL’s standards for hospital-grade power cord sets are requirements for the plug. The blades must be solid, instead of folded brass. The plug must include an internal cable retention device or flexible strain relief to prevent stress to the plug’s internal connections. The plug will be marked “Hospital Grade” and have a visible green dot.

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